Search form

Uganda

ISO: 
UGA
Subregion: 
Hide on Benchmarking: 
0
French: 
Ouganda
Spanish: 
Uganda
Hide on Nanotool: 
No
Hide on Data Download: 
No
DMP_ID: 
40
ASTI-Country: 
1
Main Agency Acronym(s): 
NARO

Sorry, this page is currently not available

Uganda: ASTI–NARO Country Factsheet

ASTI publicaiton cover

Authors:
Nienke Beintema, Daniel Kitone, and Ambrose Agona

Year:
2016

Publisher
International Food Policy Research Institute and National Agricultural Research Organisation

Publication category

Africa south of the Sahara

Related country page(s)
Uganda

Further information

Continuing growth

Agricultural R&D spending continued its growth path during 2011–2014. Total agricultural spending, adjusted for inflation, was three times higher in 2014 than in 2000. This growth was the result of increased government and donor support to NARO combined with the establishment of new universities. Consequently, the country’s 2014 research intensity ratio nearly reached the recommended 1 percent target set by the African Union and the United Nations.

Capacity strengthening at NARO

First in 2013, and secondly in 2016, the government approved large-scale salary increases, staff promotions, and staff recruitment for Uganda’s civil servants. As a result, NARO researchers received a raise twice since 2010. In addition, through the World Bank projects EAAPP and ATAAS, 42 researchers received, or are currently undertaking, MSc- and PhD-level training in Uganda or abroad (31 and 11 researchers, respectively). With these and other improvements, NARO can now provide a more competitive and incentivedriven working environment.

Increased donor funding to NARO

Under EAAPP, Uganda was selected as home to the subregion’s center of excellence in cassava research, receiving a US$30 million loan under Phase I, the majority of which was allocated to technology generation, researcher training, and the rehabilitation of NARO’s cassava research facilities. Phase-I was completed in 2015, and Phase-II is expected to begin in 2017. NARO also received funding from a wide range of donors, enabling improvements in infrastructure and investment in high-quality equipment. Nonetheless, some of NARO’s laboratories and research facilities remain inadequate.

Establishment of new universities

Rising demand for higher education has prompted a significant increase in the number of (mainly private) universities in Uganda since the 1990s, although only a minority offer agricultural programs. Those that do include four public universities (Makerere University being one), four private universities, two colleges, and one training institute. The establishment of these entities from the late 1990s has resulted in increased research capacity within the higher education sector.

Uganda: ASTI–NARO Country Factsheet

ASTI publicaiton cover

Authors:
Nienke Beintema, Daniel Kitone, Ambrose Agona, and Michael Rahija

Year:
2014

Publisher

Publication category

Africa south of the Sahara

Related country page(s)
Uganda

Total spending on agricultural R&D in Uganda grew by 15 percent during 2008–2011, mainly stemming from increased spending by the country’s main agricultural R&D agency, NARO.

The Ugandan government doubled its funding to NARO during 2008–2011 (in inflation-adjusted terms); development bank loans and donor contributions continued to be important funding sources as well, but have been highly volatile over time.

The number of FTE researchers employed at NARO and the seven other agencies involved in agricultural R&D grew during 2008–2011. Most of this growth occurred at the MSc and BSc level.

Uganda: ASTI–NARO Country Brief

ASTI publicaiton cover

Authors:
Beintema, Nienke M.; Tizikara, Clesensio

Year:
2002

Publisher
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI); International Service for National Agricultural Research (ISNAR); and National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO)

Publication category

Africa south of the Sahara

Related country page(s)
Uganda

Following the PMA framework NARO will need to narrow its mandate on noncommercial crops with the private sector becoming responsible for research on commercial crops. Until now, however, the producer organizations have not been very willing to invest in agricultural research.

Uganda’s agricultural research is characterized by its high dependence on donor funding, but donor support to NARO is expected to decline substantially in the next few years.
Alternative funding sources have to be developed such as income generation and the sale of technologies, and consultancies. However, it is not expected that funds raised through these forms of revenues will be sufficient to counterbalance the decline of donor funding. One serious additional constraint for NARO is the relative low level of salaries it is offering, which has resulted in staff departures and low staff morale. This situation will not improve with lower total funding levels. In addition, funding through the commercialization of research has been limited in part because of the reluctance of existing producer organizations to commit funds to research.

Uganda: ASTI–NARO Country Note

ASTI publicaiton cover

Authors:
Flaherty, Kathleen; Kitone, Dan; Beintema, Nienke M.

Year:
2010

Publisher
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI); and National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO)

Publication category

Africa south of the Sahara

Related country page(s)
Uganda

Public agricultural R&D investment in Uganda grew substantially during 2000–08. Initially, growth stemmed from increased donor funding, mainly through the World Bank loan–funded project ARTP II; more recently, government support increased significantly, but it largely served to redress serious contractions both in staffng and salary levels occurring from 1999 to 2005.
Reductions in researcher numbers during 1995–2005 mostly resulted from staff departures at the country’s main agricultural research agency NARO, in association with a reform process that resulted in low salaries, lack of promotional and other opportunities, low morale, and ultimately a hiring freeze between 2002 and 2005. After the recruitment restrictions were lifted in 2005 and a 100-percent salary increase was instated, total agricultural researcher numbers at NARO increased
considerably. Total research capacity at Uganda’s main higher education agency, Makerere University, also grew in recent years, strengthening the role of this sector in the performance of agricultural R&D. Despite these positive advancements, the Ugandan government still faces a number of challenges.
Agricultural R&D remains highly dependent on donor funding, the role the nonprofit and private for-profit sector in agricultural R&D remains small, and income from the commercialization of research outputs is highly limited.


This content will be added on a later date.

This content will be added on a later date.

This content will be added on a later date.
Subscribe to RSS - Uganda