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Ghana

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GHA
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Ghana
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Ghana
DMP_ID: 
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ASTI-Country: 
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Main Agency Acronym(s): 
STEPRI

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CSIR - STEPRI workshop raises awareness of the importance of evidence for ag research decisionmaking

On August 31st,  Ghana's Science and Technology Policy Research Institute (CSIR - STEPRI) together with ASTI/IFPRI, convened a stakeholders’ dissemination workshop in Accra.  The workshop presented the achievements and outcomes of the ASTI surveys in Ghana over the past few years to all the relevant stakeholders in the agriculture sector, including the agencies who provided the data. 

The specific objectives of the workshop were to:

  • offer the selected agricultural research agencies the platform to give their own assessment of the surveys,

Ghana: ASTI–STEPRI Country Factsheet

ASTI publicaiton cover

Authors:
Nienke Beintema, George Essegbey, and Roland Asare

Year:
2016

Publisher
International Food Policy Research Institute and Science and Technology Policy Research Institute

Publication category

Africa south of the Sahara

Related country page(s)
Ghana

Further information

Spending growth

Growth in agricultural research spending during 2000–2011 mostly stemmed from increased capacity at Ghana’s universities, whereas growth during 2011–2014 primarily resulted from salary increases at CSIR to institute parity with the higher education sector. Despite the increased spending, total agricultural researcher numbers actually contracted slightly during 2011–2014, mainly among researchers with BSc and MSc degrees.

Donor-driven research agenda

Since 2000, actual government funding to CSIR has been well below approved budgets. Government funding barely covers salary costs, leaving CSIR almost entirely dependent on (volatile) donor and development bank funding to finance research activities. Given that donors and development bank priorities often override national priorities, high donor dependency can potentially lead to imbalances in CSIR’s research agenda.

Staffing challenges at CSIR

The 2012 salary increases successfully curtained high staff turnover within CSIR, but the high share of researchers in the older age brackets, and especially among those with PhD degrees, is an area of serious concern at CSIR and within the higher education agencies. Training opportunities are limited, although CSIR has instituted a system whereby senior researchers mentor their younger colleagues. Developing sound training and succession plans will be key to filling existing and anticipated staffing gaps at CSIR.

Capital investments needed

Capital investments are totally inadequate at CSIR. Although government funding was allocated, no disbursements were made in 2010 and beyond to date. This obviously has serious repercussions for the council’s infrastructure, including laboratory and office space, communications and scientific equipment, vehicles for field work, and so on. CRI was the only institute to receive funding for the construction of a biotechnology laboratory associated with its research on roots and tubers under WAAPP.

Assesment of agricultural research capacities in Ghana: the case of Council for Scienctific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

ASTI publicaiton cover

Authors:
George O. Essegbey & Roland Asare

Year:
2014

Publisher
International Food Policy Research Institute and West and Central African Council for Agricultural Research and Development (CORAF/WECAR)

Publication category

Africa south of the Sahara

Related country page(s)
Ghana

During 2013–2014, ASTI, CORAF/WECARD, and national focal points carried out an in-depth assessment of the critical human, financial, and institutional capacity issues that CSIR is facing. The assessment included a quantitative survey collecting information on human and financial resources, R&D infrastructure, and R&D outputs; a series of face-to-face interviews with selected research and managerial staff; and a staff motivation survey distributed to a selected group of researchers and managerial staff. This report highlights the trends and challenges that emerged from the data, structuring it within five broad areas: funding capacity, human resource capacity, research outputs, research-related infrastructure, and institutional conditions.

Agricultural R&D in Ghana: an Assessment of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research

ASTI publicaiton cover

Authors:
George O. Essegbey & Roland Asare

Year:
2014

Publisher
International Food Policy Research Institute and West and Central African Council for Agricultural Research and Development (CORAF/WECAR)

Publication category

Africa south of the Sahara

Related country page(s)
Ghana

During 2013–2014, ASTI, CORAF/WECARD, and national focal points carried out an in-depth assessment of the critical human, financial, and institutional capacity issues that CSIR is facing. The assessment included a quantitative survey collecting information on human and financial resources, R&D infrastructure, and R&D outputs; a series of face-to-face interviews with selected research and managerial staff; and a staff motivation survey distributed to a selected group of researchers and managerial staff. This summary note highlights the trends and challenges that emerged from the data, structuring it within five broad areas: funding capacity, human resource capacity, research outputs, research-related infrastructure, and institutional conditions.

Ghana: ASTI–STEPRI Country Factsheet

ASTI publicaiton cover

Authors:
Nienke Beintema, George Essegbey, Roland Asare, and Michael Rahija

Year:
2014

Publisher
International Food Policy Research Institute and Science and Technology Policy Research Institute

Publication category

Africa south of the Sahara

Related country page(s)
Ghana

Public agricultural R&D spend- ing continued to increase during the 2008–2011 period. Growth was strongest at Ghana’s universities, although the CSIR institutes and CRIG also reported increases in spending levels during this period.

Although government support to CSIR has remained strong, government funding only covers CSIR’s salary bill and a very small share of its day-to-day operating costs. CSIR’s institutes are almost fully dependent on donor funding for their research activities.

Although government support to CSIR has remained strong, government funding only covers CSIR’s salary bill and a very small share of its day-to-day operating costs. CSIR’s institutes are almost fully dependent on donor funding for their research activities.

Ghana: ASTI–CSIR Country Brief

ASTI publicaiton cover

Authors:
Stads, Gert-Jan; Gog, Joseph O.

Year:
2004

Publisher
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI); International Service for National Agricultural Research (ISNAR); and Science and Technology Policy Research Institute (STEPRI)

Publication category

Africa south of the Sahara

Related country page(s)
Ghana

Agricultural research expenditures and funding increased marginally in  Ghana throughout the 1990s. Like counterparts across much of Africa, agricultural R&D agencies in Ghana remained highly dependent on government and donor funding, with the World Bank’s NARP and AgSSIP initiatives contributing greatly to the rehabilitation of Ghana’s weakened agricultural research infrastructure. Most notable is the shift toward commercialization of agricultural research, heralded by the 1996 CSIR Act requiring that, by 2001, 30 percent of the agricultural research budgets of CSIR agencies be generated from private sources. Only one CSIR agency has met this target to date, and consequently the government has not reduced its funding to CSIR agencies as was scheduled to occur in 2001. It remains to be seen, however, whether the government and donors continue to support agencies that fail to meet their commercialization targets in the future, given the strong focus on commercialization under AgSSIP. Another issue that may require ongoing consideration is the imbalances in capacity of CSIR agencies to successfully generate revenues given some, like FORIG and OPRI have a strong commercial focus, while others, like CRI, ARI, and SARI, focus on broader social issues like food security.

Ghana: ASTI–CSIR Country Note

ASTI publicaiton cover

Authors:
Flaherty, Kathleen; Essegbey, George Owusu; Asare, Roland

Year:
2010

Publisher
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI); and Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

Publication category

Africa south of the Sahara

Related country page(s)
Ghana

After a decade of marginal growth in the 1990s, agricultural R&D spending in Ghana has more than doubled since 2002. In 2008, the country spent 352 billion cedis or 95 million dollars on agricultural R&D (both in 2005 constant prices). Although these high growth rates are certainly an indication that agricultural R&D is a priority of the national government, a closer look at the cost category composition reveals that the overall increase in agricultural R&D spending is largely due to an increase in salary costs. In 2008, salaries accounted for 83 percent of CSIR’s total expenditures, leaving only very limited room for actual research costs and much-needed capital investments. The Ghanaian government is fully aware of the challenges that the current CSIR cost structure poses. It has therefore issued a directive in 2009 to reduce the share of salary costs in CSIR’s budget to 40 percent. Although not yet implemented, this directive could have a serious negative impact on future CSIR spending and capacity levels, forcing many CSIR agencies to either reduce the number of staff on their payroll or to generate funding from other sources. Transition to greater internal income generation continues to be a major challenge, however. Despite the fact that commercialization targets for the CSIR were set more than a decade ago, only one of the nine CSIR agencies (OPRI) comes close to reaching these targets. Donor funding continues to play an important role in financing Ghanaian agricultural R&D.

Though Ghana’s overall agricultural R&D capacity levels have shown steady growth since the turn of the millennium, especially at CSIR and the higher education agencies, many agencies are faced with an aging pool of scientists and a concurrent ban on recruitment that limits new hires. These are issues that need to be urgently addressed if Ghana is to maintain its current agricultural R&D capacity levels and to prevent the numerous training efforts that have taken place over the past decade from being eroded.

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