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  • Total agricultural researcher numbers in Morocco increased gradually throughout the 1980s and 1990s, while total agricultural R&D expenditures fluctuated somewhat erratically.
  • The National Agronomic Research Institute (INRA) and the Agronomic and Veterinary Institute Hassan II (IAV Hassan II) are Morocco’s largest R&D agencies; in 2002, they accounted for roughly 40 and 25 percent of Morocco’s fte agricultural researchers and expenditures, respectively.
  • INRA depended on national government funding, along with sizeable contributions from foreign
Country Code: 
MAR
Countries: 
  • In 2006, 167 fte's were active in agricultural research in Panama, close to 60 percent of whom were trained to the BSc level.
  • The performance of agricultural R&D in Panama is largely dominated by IDIAP.
  • Total agricultural R&D spending in Panama remained stable at around $10 million (in 2005 PPP prices) during 2001-06.
  • Agricultural R&D in Panama relies almost exclusively on government funding.
Country Code: 
PAN
Countries: 
  • The share of INIFAP in total Mexican agricultural R&D spending and capacity has gradually declined over the past decades in favor of other government agencies and the university sector.
Country Code: 
MEX
Countries: 
  • Total agricultural R&D spending in Uruguay rebounded rapidly after the 1999-2002 economic crisis, reaching $60 million (in 2005 PPP dollars) in 2006.   
  • Instituto Nacional de Investigación Agropecuaria (INIA) and Universidad de la República (UdelaR) are Uruguay’s largest agricultural R&D agencies; combined, they account for more than three-quarters of the country’s agricultural research capacity
Country Code: 
URY
Countries: 
  • In 2006, Brazil employed 5,400 FTE agricultural researchers, more than any other country in Latin America.
  • Brazil operates a two-tier system of federal- and state-based government agencies. As a semiautonomous federal agency, Embrapa is the largest agricultural R&D agency in Latin America in terms of both staff number and expenditures.
  • In addition, 16 of Brazil's 26 states operate agricultural research agencies, although most state-level activities are carried out in São Paulo.
Country Code: 
BRA
Countries: 
  • Total agricultural R&D capacity contracted significantly during 1991–2006.
  • Agricultural R&D spending developed more erratically, but it has been on the increase in recent years due mainly to increased support from IDB to university-led research and the 2005 separation of SENAVE from MAG, leading to increased funding for agrochemical and seed trials for DIA.
  • Agricultural R&D is mostly financed by the national government and internally generated resources.
Country Code: 
PRY
Countries: 
  • Agricultural R&D staff numbers have risen gradually since 1981, reaching close to 700 ftes in 2006.
  • Expenditures in agricultural R&D developed more erratically but have contracted since the late 1990s, reaching $98 million (in 2005 constant prices) in 2006, largely the result of reduced spending by INIA.
  • Average degree levels of Chilean agricultural R&D staff have improved markedly since the early 1990s, and the country’s researchers are among the region’s most highly qualified.
  • The national government funds the lion’s share of agricultural R&D i
Country Code: 
CHL
Countries: 
  • In 2006, Argentina employed close to 4,000 FTE agricultural researchers.
  • Argentina’s total agricultural research capacity has risen rapidly after the 1999-2002 economic crisis. This increase is mainly due to strong growth in INTA’s research staff totals, which rose to 2,410 in 2007 following a large injection of national government and IDB funds in support of agricultural R&D.
  • During 2002-06, Argentina’s total agricultural R&D expenditures more than doubled due to a boost in spending at INTA.
Country Code: 
ARG
Countries: 

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